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Straight Trippin’

Great news: a single psychedelic trip can induce life-long benefits, according to top gun researchers at one of America’s most esteemed med schools. It can also bring you closer to God, eliminate anxiety and amp up your creativity.


A brand new study explores mushrooms and other psychedelic substances showing how mind-bending compounds can trigger ‘God-like experiences’, producing positive, long-duration changes. Waaaaa.

The new study, published by the excellent JHPRU last week, highlights the profound, life-affirming effects of psychedelic trips with mushrooms (classic psilocybin) playing a role in (re-)programming the brain in positive ways. Subjects who tripped on the mystical, mood-altering stuff at least once or more gave glowing (‘constructive’) feedback about the experience, saying mushrooms can be an enduring “functional tool of personal transformation” with benefits accruing over time.




The participants, mostly atheists or agnostic in their religious/philosophical beliefs, reported having experiences with an “ultimate reality”, or God, despite having no association with religion or theism. Two-thirds of the subjects said that after their trip they no longer identified as atheist, and reported positive life changes and “functional benefits” such as “increased reactivity to stimuli, both internal and external, with heightened sensibilities and ecstatic awareness.” Some even sensed “cosmic connections to an omnipresence” and “divine encounters.” Whoa!

The majority of those who reported having positive experiences took psilocybin/mushrooms (1,184), then LSD (1,251), DMT (606), and ayahuasca (435). 809 people said they experienced ‘ultimate reality’ and ‘God encounters.”


“Experiences that people describe as encounters with God or a representative of God have been reported for thousands of years, and they likely form the basis of many of the world’s religions,” Roland Griffiths, professor in the Departments of Psychiatry and Neurosciences at the Johns Hopkins and the study’s lead researcher, said. “Although modern Western medicine doesn’t typically consider ‘spiritual’ or ‘religious’ experiences as one of the tools in the arsenal against sickness, our findings suggest that these encounters often lead to improvements in mental health.” Read more.